Meeting Notes 4/14

-Sexual Harassment Policy Change

-Davis Democratic Socialist club has contacts for further information/action on this front.

-We discussed the possible audience for this statement

-We can try and get signatures from faculty in this department

Upper Division Discussion sections

-Undergraduate Curriculum Committee is currently meeting

-Facebook page is up, will be up and running soon

-There was lots of enthusiasm for physics club upper divisions

-We could write up an “I want discussion sections because…” template in the physics club space so that people can take pictures on their own.

-Need a statement of interest

-We ultimately want to have something to present to the department.

-We could do a presentation in a faculty meeting

-Andy will schedule a meeting in the next few weeks to meet with upper division undergraduates.

-Chair of engineering dept. says discussion sections have not happened yet because it’s very complex to make a curriculum change to a course.

-H-Bar is a good interim measure, but this is a first step of a larger change.

-Undergraduate curriculum committee- we could push to allow graduate students or, better yet, undergraduate students to be on the committee.

Main topic: Colloquium

-While this was very encouraging in terms of our department’s commitment to diversity, it seemed that there was more interest in affirmations of what we do right rather than identification of places we need to improve.

-Some of the definitions and examples of microaggressions seemed confusing and conflicting.

-Do people actually say positive and welcoming things or do they think they say these things?

-Ultimately, this was not a good forum for identifying places where improvement is needed, because power dynamics can shut down the conversation.

-Is it ever possible to call for improvement from faculty given our position in the University? Saying something like “When you said this, that affected me in this way…” would give feedback about how welcoming the physics classroom environment is, but is giving that feedback always putting one at risk? Is there a way to do this anonymously?

-We could include a 1uestion on course evaluations for inclusions/diversity/feeling valued feedback.

-Do we get a realistic and honest performance review from advisers? Rarely. Can we make that possible?

-Undergraduates don’t have faculty advisers, which is unusual.

-Evaluations from the department as a separate thing just for the physics department. In coursework, someone would need to read it.

-problems: creates more work, accountability

-Evaluations: who reads them? Are they open?

-Evaluations can be read by other people.

-We may want to bring this evaluations idea up during climate survey.

-time constraints from demanding workload is mitigated by privilege and primarily negatively affect people from lower socioeconomic status

-Environmental microaggressions were discussed:

-better seats that everyone can sit in.

-better handicap access to lecture hall.

Wrap up:

-Next week: pictures taken : #DiscUpPhyiscs

-We should try to set up a physical box for anonymous discussion topics during the climate site survey.

-Amanda will look at sexual harassment statement.

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Physics Colloquium 4/11/2016

Here are the slides from the presentation and the bibliography referenced during the presentation given by Binnie Singh and Mikael Villalobos on Monday, April 11, 2016.

Understanding Bias and Microaggression Physics Colloquium slides

Bibliography of Research Cited and Consulted organized by topic

Title: Understanding Bias and Microaggression
Speakers: Binnie Singh and Mikael Villalobos
Binnie Singh, Assistant Vice Provost, Academic Affairs
Mikael Villalobos, Associate Chief Diversity Officer, Office of Campus Community Relations

Abstract: Referencing the work of Chester Pierce and Derald Wing Sue, this seminar explores the concepts of bias and microaggression within the framework of multi-cultural competency development, with the goal of achieving inclusion excellence in organizations and work environments.

Members of Diversity & Inclusion in Physics were pleased to see that around fifty members of the Physics Department, including undergraduates, graduate students, postdocs and faculty, attended the colloquium and engaged actively in discussion and questioning of the material presented. We hope that the conversations started during the colloquium continue in our department.